The Institute for Clinical Social Work


Syllabi Archive

CLDL 623: Clinical Process and Technique III

Ph.D. Program - Distance Learning: spring 2012-13


Anita Bryce, Ph.D.


Course Description

This course, the third in the technique sequence, will aim to elucidate the technique and technical issues which typically arise in the process of psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Aspects of therapeutic action including transference, countertransference, reconstruction, development of an observing ego, identification with the benign superego of the therapist, defense interpretation, moment to moment listening, and neutrality will be explored in an effort to accomplish this above stated goal. Papers will be reviewed in chronological order, thus providing historical scaffolding for understanding the evolution of psychoanalytic thinkers over the course of the last 100 years.

The students will rotate in presenting the highlights of the assigned readings. Students will also rotate in presenting clinical material which will be discussed by the class.


Course Objectives

  1. Students will be able to identify the factors that are mutative in the psychoanalytic process.
  2. Students will develop a more consolidated understanding of the technical approaches characteristic of a psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy.
  3. Students will be able to recognize how aspects of therapeutic action impact technique and vice versa.
  4. Students will be able to understand the evolution of ego psychoanalytic thinking on the topic of therapeutic action.

Evaluation

Grades will be based 50% on class participation including presentation of highlights of assigned readings and case presentations, and 50% on written assignments.

  • Assignment I is due the day you present your case presentation for the first time. It should be no longer than 8 pages and include the following: a brief history; an assessment of the ego strengths and weakness of the patient; a description of the course of treatment for the patient so far.
  • Assignment II is due the last day of class. It is to be no longer than 10 pages. Utilizing clinical material from the case you presented earlier in the semester, and the knowledge you have gained from your experience in the course, demonstrate your understanding of the ways in which technique has contributed to therapeutic action and therefore therapeutic change. The paper should contain direct quotes illustrative of the process between you and your patient.

Attendance and Late Policy

Prompt and regular attendance is expected. I anticipate that you will contact me if you will be late or absent. More than one absence may result in a lowered grade.


Schedule

Class I - January 24, 2013

  1. Freud, S. (1962a). Observations on transference love. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The standard edition (Vol. 12, pp. 157-171). London; Hogarth Press (Original work published in 1912)
  2. Freud, S. (1962a). Recommendations to physicians practicing psychoanalysis. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The standard edition (Vol. 12, pp.109-120). London: Hogarth Press. (Original work published in 1912)
  3. Freud, S. (1962a). Remembering, repeating and working through. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The standard edition ( Vol. 12, pp.145-156). London: Hogarth Press. (Original work published in 1912)
  4. Freud, S. (1962a). The dynamics of transference. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The standard edition (Vol. 12, pp. 97-108). London: Hogarth Press. (Original work published in 1912)
  5. Friedman, L. (2008) A renaissance for Freud’s papers on technique, Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Vol. 77, pp. 1031-1044.

Class II - February 7, 2013

  1. Strachey, J. (1934). The nature of the therapeutic action of psychoanalysis, International Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol.15, pp.137-159.

Class III -  February 21, 2013

  1. Loewald, H. (1960). On the therapeutic action of psychoanalysis, International Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 41, pp. 16-33.

Class IV - March7, 2013

  1. Bird, B. (1972). Notes on transference: Universal phenomenon and hardest part of analysis, Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, Vol. 20, pp. 267-301.
  2. Sandler, J. (1976). Countertransference and role responsiveness, International Review of Psycho-Analysis, Vol.3, pp. 43-47.

Class V -  March 23, 2013

  1. Loewald, H. (1986). Transference countertransference, Journal of the American Psychological Association, Vol. 34 pp.275-287.
  2. Blum, H. (1986). Countertransference and the theory of technique: discussion, Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, Vol. 34, pp.309-328.

Class VI - April 4, 2013

  1. Gray, P. (1973). Psychoanalytic technique and the ego’s capacity for viewing intrapsychic activity, Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, Vol. 21, pp. 474-494.
  2. Davison, W. (1984) Reflections on the mutative interpretation, defence analysis, and self analysis, The International Review of Psych-Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 143-149.

Class VII - April 18, 2013

  1. Busch, F (1996). The ego and its significance in the analytic process, Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, Vol. 44, pp. 1073-1099.
  2. Chused, J. (1996). The therapeutic action of psychoanalysis; Abstinence and informative experience, Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, Vol. 44, pp.1047-1071.
  3. Gabbard, G. and Westen, D. (2003). Rethinking therapeutic action, International Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 84, pp.823-841.

Please note that links to some course readings have been purged from archived syllabi. Electronic texts on the ICSW website are protected by copyright law. These files are made available strictly for individual, educational use and may not be copied or distributed in any way. Distribution of copyrighted material to non-enrolled individuals or ICSW students will be considered an act of Academic Dishonesty and be dealt with accordingly as indicated in the Student Manual. Federal penalties for copyright infringement may be found at www.copyright.gov.